Aurora Australis Over Lighthouse Panorama, Tasmania, Australia

Aurora Australis photograph (panorama panoramic) with a lighthouse from Tasmania, Australia. Aurora Australis, the Southern Lights, from Goat's Bluff, South Arm, near Hobart, Tasmania. There is a lighthouse light reflecting in the water, and the aurora is colored pink, green, red, purple and blue. There is an aurora reflection in the ocean water and beach.

TASMANIAN WILDERNESS LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY SERIES

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“The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands. Day after day they pour forth speech; night after night they display knowledge. There is no speech or language where their voice is not heard. Their voice goes out into all the earth, their words to the ends of the world.” (Psalm 19:1-4)

“My heart rejoices in the LORD…” (1 Samuel 2:1)

Hallelujah! I thank and praise God for providing a good geomagnetic storm that sparked some brilliant Aurora Australis (Southern Lights) over us here in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.

In the few days leading up to this storm I frequently checked my favorite aurora websites, www.spaceweather.com and www.aurora-service.net with great anticipation. However, despite all of our modern aurora forecasts, aurora alerts and NASA gadgets that monitor the solar weather, the aurora is still completely unpredictable. For a landscape photographer to capture a great aurora shot is quite an exciting challenge.

This panorama photograph of the Aurora Australis was taken from Goat’s Bluff on South Arm, roughly a half hour southeast of Hobart, Tasmania. I arrived at sunset and waited for the light to fade enough to capture the aurora, which unfortunately, peaked in the middle of our daylight hours. As the lighthouse began its night watch, I kept doing test shots…nothing…nothing…nothing.

Usually during a good sized geomagnetic storm there is at least a faint auroral glow on the horizon even if there aren’t any beams or bands of aurora dancing in the sky. The camera can also capture aurora when it is not visible to our naked eye.

After an hour and a half of not seeing even a faint auroral glow, all of a sudden the Southern Lights unexpectedly erupted on the horizon. It was clearly visible to my naked eye, in fact, spectacular! In awe I watched the brilliant show in the heavens as I captured shot after shot. It lasted about a half hour, and then just as quickly as it appeared it disappeared.

I truly rejoice in the Lord that he not only provided the Aurora Australis for me but that he also provided a clear night (the only one in about a week of completely overcast, rainy weather) as well as a computer program that was successfully able to stitch this aurora panorama together.

Everything came together just right in this photo, and for that I rejoice in the Lord!

(See also, “Bushfire Aurora” (Tasmanian Wilderness Landscape Photography Series) and “Aurora Australis Over Goat’s Bluff” (Tasmanian Wilderness Landscape Photography Series).)